Studies Suggest We Are Slowly Suffocating

  • Air pollution may contribute to the development of asthma in previously healthy people.
  • A recent Los Angeles study found that 8% of childhood asthma cases are a result of living within 250 feet to major roadways.
  • The gains in lung function paralleled improving air quality in the communities studied, and across the Los Angeles basin, as policies to fight pollution took hold.
  • The research appears in the March 5, 2015 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that air pollution is causing an increase in respiratory illnesses, as much as 50% in some areas. The result is that asthma has grown into an epidemic in the United States. Breathing exercises that can help are often overlooked.affects 16.2 adults and 6.7 million children.
  • The most common chronic childhood disease in the country affects 1 in every ten kids and links is now correlated with allergies.
  • Common air pollutants slow children’s lung growth according to results of a comprehensive, ten-year study from the University of Southern California Children’s Health Study.

When the quality of our air is weak, we tend to breathe shallower, and we absorb more toxins.

The resulting rapid, shallow breathing leads to inadequate oxygen supply, respiratory disease, and fatigue.  Parents may resort to the strongest medications to help their children breathe better and remain active. On the other hand, many parents are uneasy with the constant intake of medication and look for alternative ways to reduce their children’s need for bronchodilators and steroid-based drugs.

Solution: Breathing Exercises

The environmental facts speak openly about the necessity and urgency to take action and improve our breathing capacity.  To enjoy health, we must enhance our breathing ability and understand that:

  1.  Shallow breathing increases stress and anxiety.
  2. Deeper breathing exercises bring relaxation and the ability to manage better asthma episodes.

The first step in the breathing process is inhaling. After oxygen enters the lungs, it is picked up by hemoglobin in the blood and sent to all the cells. Once in the cells, oxidation, the method of combining the nutrients from food with oxygen, creates energy. Oxygen maintains cells and keeps them clean and healthy. At the same time, oxygen helps remove waste from the body and reduces inflammation. Breathing that is more efficient increases oxygen in the body.

Children are especially at risk for respiration difficulties because their growing bodies require oxygen. Moreover, their bodies must be capable of using that oxygen efficiently. Unless the muscles responsible for respiration are exercised through deep breathing techniques, the rib cage and surrounding tissues get stiff, which makes inhalation more difficult. Less suppleness and weak muscles leave stale air in the tissues of the lungs and prevent fresh oxygen from reaching the bloodstream. This stunts growth, depresses the immune system, and contributes to disease. By teaching children to breathe fully and deeply, you can positively impact their health for a lifetime.

First Graders Can Do It

The International Breath Institute helps you retrain poor breathing habits in a three-step breathing exercise called Full-Wave Breathing. Full-Wave breathing fights the toxins that pollute our cities by strengthening the lungs, relieving bronchitis, improving circulation, oxygenating the blood and minimizing the reoccurrence of respiratory ailments.

Research from the International Breath Institute shows that first-grade children, who sat for long periods of time in their seats, breathed shallower and shallower as the day pro­gressed. Their postures slumped, and their eyes glazed. Learning cannot take place under such conditions.

But, when their teacher led them through deep breathing exercises for ten minutes each day after lunch, something amazing happened. They felt upbeat! They learned and concentrated more easily. They were relaxed and could shift attention without difficulty after recess. The first graders reminded each other to use their breath before each assignment, and they practiced breathing while walking in the hallway, which helped them not chatter and disturb oth­ers.[i]

Emotional Links to Allergies and Asthma

Emotional reactions affect our breathing.

breathing problems
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Fear accelerates breathing.

Anger pumps our breathing like a spewing volcano.

Sadness and grief inhibit breathing.

Well-known asthma triggers are exercise, emotional stress or emotional excitement.

Shallow breathers are more anxious and impulsive.

Breathing is the only body function that we do involuntarily, and that we can voluntarily control. We can influence our autonomic nervous systems and positively affect other systems in the body like circulation, respiration, and digestion.

How people breathe affects their attitudes. Deep breathers are more relaxed and balanced. Shallow breathers are more anx­ious and impulsive. Full-Wave Breathing is a smooth and successful tool to help children develop better resilience and emotional strength!

You can’t breathe for your kids, but you can help them with breathing exercises to give them an extra edge in fighting illness every day. Use the Full Wave Breathing method with your children and you will see the difference it makes.

 

OTHER LINKS WITH UPDATED POLLUTION NEWS:

NEWS RELEASE: Research links tobacco smoke and roadway air pollution with childhood obesity

 

NEWS RELEASE: Research raises new concerns about air pollution impacts at Los Angeles International Airport

 

 

 

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